Suggested Courses

Global Mining Law Program

James E. Rogers College of Law
Law/Policy

The University of Arizona Law Global Mining Law program fosters productive dialogue, research, and training in global mining and natural resources law and development. The Global Mining Law program provides training to both lawyers and non-lawyers from around the globe, engages in cutting-edge research on issues related to all aspects of global mining law and policy, fosters productive dialogue among various stakeholders in the mining and natural resources sector, and develops innovative real-world solutions to law and policy issues of importance to mining, natural resource, and energy development.

Ideally located in southern Arizona, a region rich in mining industry and leaders in natural resources, the program offers a variety of degree and non-degree training opportunities, including:
1. Master’s degrees with a Mining Law and Policy focus for both lawyers (an LLM) and non-lawyers (an MLS) — both offered online and on campus.
2. Certificate courses, including online programs, for those involved in mining-related work, including executives, lawyers, managers, engineers, and government officials.
3. Executive education, annual conferences, and workshops for those involved in mining and energy developments.

For more information, visit: https://law.arizona.edu/programs/global-mining-law

Mining Law and Policy Concentration

James E. Rogers College of Law
• Online
Law/Policy

University of Arizona Law's Master of Legal Studies (MLS) fully online degree with a concentration in Mining Law and Policy introduces lawyers and mining professionals to the range of legal issues that arise in the acquisition of mineral properties and the related financing, mining and environmental considerations faced by the modern mining industry.

The degree takes advantage of the world-class educational resources in mining and mining law available at The University of Arizona, including the James E. Rogers College of Law and the J. David Lowell Institute for Mineral Resources (which includes connections with the university's public health, science, and engineering departments). As a result of these resources and the strong collaboration with other departments who are undertaking mining-related research across campus, we are able to offer you both broad and deep training in a variety of aspects of mining, from the business side of mining to regulatory compliance, tax, environmental, and concerns of indigenous peoples.

For more information, visit: https://law.arizona.edu/mining-law-and-policy-concentration-online

ANTH 329 Cultures and Societies of Africa

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Community Engagement

Introduction to African prehistory, social anthropology, ecology, religions, ancient and modern state formation, slavery, urbanization, and contemporary issues.

ANTH 331  Anthropology and Development

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Community Engagement

The role of anthropology in interdisciplinary projects involving economic development and planned change on the national and international levels.

ANTH 332 Environmental Archaeology

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person

Introduction to the methods of analyses available to archaeologists and allied scientists for reconstructing ancient environments. Topics include a review of dating methods; the Earth's environments and causes of environmental change; geological approaches to reconstructing past landscapes; and use of ancient plant and animal remains for interpreting past environments. Tours of key dating and paleoenvironmental labs on the UA campus.

ANTH 424A Political Ecology

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Community Engagement
Law/Policy

This course introduces a variety of environmental thought linking the political sphere and the biosphere. It examines ecological economics, environmental history and ethics, theoretical ecology, ecofeminism, political ecology in anthropology and intellectual property law.

ANTH 474/574 Archaeometry: Scientific Methods in Art and Archaeology

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Community Engagement

Critical survey of scientific methods used in archaeology and art history. Emphasis on the potential and limitations of these techniques for reconstructing human behavior.

EHS 422/522 Introduction to Occupational Safety

College of Public Health
3 units • Graded • In Person
Public Health

Fundamentals of occupational safety, emphasizing regulatory requirements and best-practices targeted to eliminate major sources of occupational injuries. Hazard identification, behavioral safety, and incident investigation will be discussed.

EHS 484/584 Fundamentals of Industrial and Environmental Health

College of Public Health
3 units • Graded • In Person
Public Health

Introduction to the principles of occupational and environmental health, with emphasis on industrial hygiene aspects of recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental and industrial health hazards.

ENVS 310 Ecosystem Health and Justice

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Community Engagement
Environmental Science
Law/Policy
Public Health

Across America, one in four Americans lives within 3 miles of a hazardous waste site (U.S. General Accounting Office, 2013). This means that one's zip code can be more important than their genetic code. Today's complex environmental science problems have far-reaching impacts and require an understanding of natural sciences, health, and justice. This course addresses this challenge by exploring and focusing on how to generate environmental science solutions at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and community levels. Students will not only gain a fundamental understanding of the natural sciences, health, and justice, they will learn how to apply the science to solve real world problems. Through the lens of environmental justice, this class will emphasize race, socioeconomics, and gender to explore the ways in which diverse individuals and societies are generating solutions to environmental quality and health challenges. The course will focus on the United States but will incorporate case studies from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and/or Middle East.

ENVS 415/515 Translating Environmental Science

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Environmental Science

Scientists speak a different language, a dialect filled with abstract symbolism, hypotheses and references to Latin and Greek. In this course, students learn journalism techniques to translate environmental science topics into language a layperson could appreciate. The writing concepts will apply to any field of science, as well as grant proposals, public reports and media including web-based publishing. Students also learn techniques for converting numbers into relevant statistics. Students will "workshop" in groups and work closely with the instructor to produce publication-quality articles on assigned or agreed-upon topics. The best of these could be posted on university-affiliated websites, with credit given to the author.

ENVS 480/580 Environmental Assessment for Contaminated Sites

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Environmental Science

The goal of this course is to advance students' knowledge of various concepts and methods used in assessing human-impacted resources such as contaminated sites, waste places, and disturbed sites to ensure efficient and effective remediation and restoration programs. Focusing on contaminated sites, the course covers socioeconomic, biophysical, political, and cultural dimensions of the impacted sites as well as the assessment of the sustainability of remedial options. The course is delivered through interactive lectures, discussions, and classroom presentations, and is team taught by faculty with varied expertise.

ENVS 482/582 Reclamation and Redevelopment of Impacted Lands

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
3 units • Graded • In Person
Environmental Science

We are now living in the Anthropocene, meaning human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment. Humans have impacted the land in numerous of ways, such as mining and other resource extraction activities, agriculture, urban development, industrial activities, and waste production. For example, in the U.S. alone, there are approximately 235,000-355,000 hazardous waste sites (USEPA, 2004). These activities have impacted our ecosystem and the services they provide for human health and well-being. It is critical to reclaim and redevelop these lands in order to improve ecosystem and public health. There is much work to be done and this is a time for innovation! It is critical to generate salient solutions to managing and redeveloping human impacted lands. This course will introduce the concepts and methods governing the sustainable management, restoration, and redevelopment of human-impacted lands. The topics covered include soil quality concepts; the energy-water-food nexus; redevelopment of brownfields and other impacted lands; reclamation of mining and other resource-extraction sites; natural-disaster cleanup; urban agriculture and community gardens. Using an inquiry-based approach, students will learn how to develop solutions based on environmental science, ecological principles, and management efficacy. Through class projects and case studies, students will work through a multi-step process, including site assessment, setting remediation/reclamation/restoration goals, developing possible solutions, and methods to determine effectiveness/indicators of success.

ENVS 696P Hazardous Waste Risk and Remediation in the US Southwest

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
1 units • Graded/PF Option • In Person
Community Engagement
Environmental Science

Interdisciplinary trainees who participate in a colloquium, professional development activities and research translation/community engagement activities.

Note: Alternative grading used: S, P, F.

MNE 414/514 Tailing Monitoring and Environmental Impacts

College of Engineering
N/A units
Environmental Science

MNE 441/541 Environmental Management and Mine Reclamation

College of Engineering
3 units • Graded • In Person
Environmental Science

Principles and practices of mine environmental management and reclamation; pre-mining assessment. Design of water management systems (contaminant removal; settling ponds, groundwater protection); recontouring and revegetation; air quality management; noise and seismic mitigation. Maintaining permits; closure and bond release and ultimate land use. Best management practices.

MNE 670 Applied Earth Science Measurement and Imaging

College of Engineering
3 units • Graded • In Person

Applied Earth Science measurements, data processing, and Imaging in an engineering context with heavy emphasis on understanding practical aspects of problem solving, and data collection design and field implementation. Methods and applications of multiply types of data collection systems as well as the associated data processing, imaging and interpretation of the data as pertaining to the needs of a project will be covered.

Course is also offered online.

RNR 696C Topics in Mine Environment Management

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
1-2 units • Graded • In Person
Environmental Science

Topics in state of the art and practice for mine reclamation and environmental management of mine sites will be discussed from current literature. Students will gain an understanding of mining operations and the environmental impacts of the mine that need to be managed. Students will integrate readings in soil science, geology, hydrology, chemistry, biology, and engineering to formulate research topics.

Course is also available online.